Kimberley regales in Medieval merriment

Learn about Vikings, knights and all things medieval at the 2018 edition of the Kimberley Medieval Festival

Two combatants duke it out in the fenced-in battle arena.

Two combatants duke it out in the fenced-in battle arena. — Kyle Born photo

The Kimberley City Bakery hosted its fourth Medieval Festival on July 14 and 15, 2018. It was the biggest edition yet and event organizers Eric and Michelle Forbes put on a mesmerizing showcase once again at Centennial Park.

The Kimberley Medieval Festival gives visitors the chance to watch battle re-enactments, eat medieval food and learn about the culture of Vikings and knights.

There was some uncertainty as to whether there would be any subsequent medieval festivals in Kimberley since the couple announced that this would be their final time hosting the event. At the close of the weekend, it was announced that Silverhorse will be organizing the Kimberley Medieval Festival from here on out.

Apart from that big news, the Forbes team had an even greater announcement.

Take a look at the assortment of photos below to get a sense of what it’s like to be at the Kimberley Medieval Festival. Captions contain a simple title, explanation or a quote from Cole Peardon, competitor for Fighters of the Feral Fang, an armoured combatant group based in Cranbrook. 

 

Cole Peardon gears up for his upcoming fight.

Cole Peardon gears up for his upcoming fight. “Someone from a previous year said, ‘If there is someone crazy or stupid enough to be willing to do this, step forward.’ We were some of the three people who stepped forward and said, ‘Absolutely! We want to be a part of this.’ All of the groups have been extremely helpful getting everybody set up.” — Kyle Born photo

 

Eric and Michelle Forbes, Kimberley City Bakery owners and event organizers, once again donned festive king and queen garb for the event.

Eric and Michelle Forbes, Kimberley City Bakery owners and event organizers, once again donned festive king and queen garb for the event. — Kyle Born photo

Event organizer Michelle Forbes has published a historically accurate children’s Viking picture book. Take a look at MichelleForbesAuthor.com

Event organizer Michelle Forbes has published a historically accurate children’s Viking picture book. Take a look at MichelleForbesAuthor.com — Kyle Born photo

Archers shoot arrows at targets.

“Look around for groups that are in your area. There are lots of people who are active in the sport and would love to get more people involved. Find your local group, do some research on medieval times. After that, invest money into kits, training and weapons.” — Kyle Born photo

Multiple knights get in a fight

“I've always loved medieval arms, armour and things like that. This is a chance to relive history. Getting into the ring and swinging a sword at somebody—it's a lot of fun!” — Kyle Born photo

The Kimberley Centennial Park ball diamond transforms into a Viking village during the festival.

The Kimberley Centennial Park ball diamond transforms into a Viking village during the festival. — Logan Shellborn photo

Chuckles and chortles come courtesy of the jester.

Chuckles and chortles come courtesy of the jester. — Kyle Born photo

Cole Peardon parries an oncoming attack.

Cole Peardon parries an oncoming attack. “Everybody, at some point when they were a kid, was running around playing knights in armour, running around hitting their friends with sticks. This is the big kid version of that. You want to be that little kid again.” — Kyle Born photo

Knights line up against one another for combat

(Regarding injuries) “It's mostly bumps and bruises. There are some bad things that can happen. One of my co-fighters, Laura, had a tooth knocked out from a shield punch to the face. I've seen knees dislocated and concussions. I try to avoid getting into those kind of situations.” — Kyle Born photo

A goat wanders by tents in the Viking village

Animals need a place to sleep too, you know. — Logan Shellborn photo

Whoosh! Arrows fly through the air during an archery demonstration.

Whoosh! Arrows fly through the air during an archery demonstration. — Kyle Born photo

Knights fight for position in the arena

(Regarding injuries) “It's mostly bumps and bruises. There are some bad things that can happen. One of my co-fighters, Laura, had a tooth knocked out from a shield punch to the face. I've seen knees dislocated and concussions. I try to avoid getting into those kind of situations.” — Kyle Born photo

My son, Augustus, isn’t quite sure what to think about being held by an intimidating Viking as he sits on his impressive throne.

My son, Augustus, isn’t quite sure what to think about being held by an intimidating Viking as he sits on his impressive throne. — Kyle Born photo

(L to R) Becky, Augustus and Kyle Born enjoy snake-on-a-stick from the Kimberley City Bakery. Nom nom nom!

(L to R) Becky, Augustus and Kyle Born enjoy snake-on-a-stick from the Kimberley City Bakery. Nom nom nom! — Kyle Born photo

Kyle Born

Kyle Born is a writer for Kootenay Business and his initials match that of the magazine—it must be fate that brought them together. View all of Kyle Born’s articles

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