For an easy ride, take the bus

BC Transit partners with communities to increase livability

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BC Transit passengers relax and take in the sights on a stress-free journey/commute.

BC Transit passengers relax and take in the sights on a stress-free journey/commute. — Photo courtesy BC Transit

Convenient, affordable transportation is key to a community’s livability, and BC Transit is providing that key. BC Transit partners with local government, businesses and the provincial government to supply transit services to communities that might otherwise not have them.

“We have over 80 transit systems across B.C., in over 130 communities,” said Jonathon Dyck, communications manager for BC Transit, “and that provides service to 1.5 million people across the province, outside the Lower Mainland.”

In the Kootenay region BC Transit serves Cranbrook, Kimberley and the West Kootenay, and is providing the region with new buses to replace some that are approaching the end of their service life.

“We’re excited to provide new buses, to be better able to support customers and their journeys,” Dyck said.

Trail welcomes the arrival of new buses, with a gathering of BC Transit operating company partners and local government partners. — Photo courtesy BC Transit

Dyck provided Kootenay Business with a summary of planned improvements in local transit.

East Kootenay

In 2019, BC Transit will work with the City of Cranbrook to increase handyDART service for early 2020.
BC Transit will work with the City of Kimberley to increase service between Kimberley and Cranbrook immediately, subject to available provincial funding.
In 2019 BC Transit and the Regional District of East Kootenay will review current transit service and identify priorities in the Columbia and Elk valleys.

West Kootenay

BC Transit, the Regional District of Central Kootenay and the City of Nelson are together developing a Transit Future Service Plan. The plan will be guided by the Greater Trail Transit Service Review completed in 2016.

The plan development process involves local officials, local transit staff and community stakeholders, to help assess current and medium-term transit needs based on land use changes, post-secondary transit demand and other trends across communities in the region.

Using the service

Cranbrook’s annual transit ridership numbers remain at about 203,000 passenger trips during 12,000 service hours. The West Kootenay had 704,000 passenger trips throughout the region in 2017-2018.

“We know that transportation is important in these communities, and that’s why we’re taking steps to move transit forward,” said Dyck. “As we continue to promote the system and work with local government, we hope to see more people choose to use the bus as their mode of transportation.”

Marie Milner

Marie Milner is a writer and photographer for Kootenay Business magazine and several other publications. She appreciates the inspiration that she gets during her interviews and hopes to share that inspiration with you. View all of Marie Milner’s articles

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