This hometown Cranbrook entrepreneur fidgeted and spun his way to success

“I want to make stuff that you could hand down to your kids and doesn’t ever wear out.” — Kris Eliuk

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Kris Eliuk has black-rimmed glasses, a stubbled face and a grey Yoshi hat.

Kris Eliuk created Yellowday Energy two years ago in Cranbrook, his hometown, where he makes functional metal art. — Photo courtesy Kris Eliuk

They don’t make them like that anymore.

It’s a common complaint nowadays, and rightfully so. But just when it seems like quality craftsmanship is a thing of the past, creative types like Kris Eliuk spring forth with innovative creations that capture imaginations and last for generations.

“Way back in the day, items were produced that lasted, not like they are today where everything seems to be disposable,” Eliuk said. “I want to make stuff that you could hand down to your kids and doesn’t ever wear out.”

Eliuk, owner of Yellowday Energy in Cranbrook, makes functional metal art, which includes flashlights, lanyard beads, high-end fidget spinners, patches and bottle openers.

“The best part of my job is creating something new,” said Eliuk. “I am very low tech, I like to start by drawing with pencil and paper. Then we 3D the drawing on the computer software and go right into production from there. About 90 per cent of what I manufacture is all done with CNC (computer numerically controlled) machines.”

A blue and purple flashlight.

When Eliuk started out, he only had one product, a high-end fidget spinner. Now he has designed and produced over 60 different products. — Photo courtesy Kris Eliuk

Eliuk has had a winding road to get to where he is, creating lasting works of art as a business. It all started for him when he had an unfortunate car accident in 2016.

“The damage to my back was so bad that it took me years to be able to walk without a cane,” Eliuk said. “To this day, I still see a chiropractor and massage therapist weekly.”

While in recovery from the accident, one of Eluik’s friends brought him a fidget spinner. At first, Eliuk wasn’t too enthusiastic about the gift, but then his mind spun with possibilities. 

“At the time, no one had ever heard of fidget spinners,” Eliuk said. “I immediately thought it was stupid . . . but then I couldn’t put it down. Soon enough, I started trying to figure out how to make my own and that is where all this started.”

Yellowday Energy is a yellow building with an orange door. A black pickup truck with Yellowday Energy written on the side is parked in front.

Yellowday Energy is entering its third year in business, right in Eliuk’s hometown in Cranbrook. — Photo courtesy Kris Eliuk

Yellowday Energy is entering its third year in business, right in Eliuk’s hometown in Cranbrook. When Eliuk started out, he only had one product, a high-end fidget spinner. Now he has designed and produced over 60 different products.

“Many of my items can be taken apart and put back together with interchangeable parts, and with such fine detail that you would never know,” said Eliuk. “If I can see something working in my mind I won’t hesitate to make it.” 

Kyle Born

Kyle Born is a writer for Kootenay Business and his initials match that of the magazine—it must be fate that brought them together. View all of Kyle Born’s articles

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